Tag Archives: inspiration

Deepening conversations

Yesterday I had the privilege to attend a lecture given by poet-philosopher David Whyte at the Ashmolean Museum. I’ve been dimly aware of Whyte’s work for a number of years, but my interest intensified last April during a poetry retreat on Iona in the Scottish Hebrides.

Sure enough, and true to the Law of Attraction, having ignited my awareness, I then began ‘seeing’ David everywhere. When the ad popped up on my Facebook feed about the talk he was giving in Oxford I made my reservation immediately.

For three whole hours yesterday afternoon I was caught in a spell of contemplation and appreciation. Conversations are fundamentally the way we engage in the world, and with ourselves, so learning how to deepen them, and how to interrupt the same old narratives of our lives which don’t always serve us, was the most wonderful gift for a chilly Friday in January.

David’s new book is titled “A Timeless Way: The Art and Practice of Deepening Conversations”. Although not yet ready for publication he explained that it sets out six steps to effect change in our existing conversations – and hence in our experience.

Three hours was not enough to go through every step. But we were able to explore the power of just a couple of them – interspersed with and enhanced by David’s resonant, insistent poetry recitals and profound, amusing stories. It was a wonderful and nourishing experience.

The practice of conversing with ourselves is of course one which we undertake in our journals. However, the quality of the conversation we maintain may not always be of service to us. We all fall into the trap of repeating thoughts and beliefs which persuade us that we, and the world, are a certain way, denying ourselves the creative certainty of living a different kind of life.

David’s work gives us a template to shift and deepen our perceptions and our understanding, gently challenging us to consider what are the conversations we need to stop having, and what is our relationship to the unknown.

As I learned yesterday, turning our sincere attention to these questions for even a short time initiates a collective easing open of hearts and minds. The effect was both palpable and magical.

David Whyte’s Timeless Way

Sincere thanks to Paul and Marie of The Beyond Partnership for facilitating the event.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Philosophy, Poetry, Reflection, review, Uncategorized

Half way point

2018 is half a month old – which means so is my resolution to be more mindful of what I eat and to look after myself better.

A couple of years ago I discovered the Whole30 approach to food and I gave it a whirl – 30 days of eliminating sugar, grains, gluten, alcohol, legumes and dairy from my diet. I ended up learning how to prepare fresh meat, seafood, vegetables and fruit in delicious ways. I pretty much gave up my dependence on bread, developed the taste for black coffee, got a huge energy boost and lost twenty pounds.

Then I got lazy again and undid all my good work.

SO since 2018 started on a Monday, which means that I can track the date and the plan simultaneously on the calendar without having to do any adding up, AND since I am eager again to experience the energy benefits, not to mention to fit into my clothes better, I was inspired to give whole30 another go this month.

And it’s going very very well.

whole30

I’ve just moved into Tiger Blood phase. Energy is high, I feel positive, optimistic, and hugely inspired.

And inspiration is key. I want to feel full of energy. I want to feel comfortable in my clothes. I love the feeling of mindfully planning my meals and shopping for fresh ingredients that will transform into delicious dinners. I’m excited about my tastes changing, becoming more satisfied by fresh flavours rather than anaesthetised by the Sugar Dragon.

Plus I love crossing the dates of the calendar. Once a journaling nerd, always a journaling nerd.

Leave a comment

Filed under Goal-setting, inspiration, mindfulness, Self-Care, Uncategorized

Inspiration or Motivation

I have often found it a lot of effort to motivate myself. I usually manage it – but it often leaves me feeling tired, and unlikely to want to repeat the effort any time soon.

So I was delighted to hear Abraham Hicks’ insistence that there is more joyful productivity likely when we are moved by inspiration rather than motivation.

This was music to my ears.

For years I have periodically asserted that I like to “follow my nose” in my projects, commercial or creative. I usually prefer to see where the mood takes me, rather than slavishly follow a pattern or plan, which quickly has me restless and bored.

To me, this is all about being guided by inspiration rather than force. It feels like gliding rather than trudging through life.

This way of proceeding can prove chaotic, indecisive and messy to the casual observer. It might seem flakey, unreliable and weird.

Of course that would be a problem if I were here to live life according to someone else’s agenda.

But since I’m not here to do that, following my nose, or my heart, or my bliss, makes things much more fun and spontaneous moment to moment. It means I get to choose the impulse that feels the best to me, and follow that to its conclusion. It also feels less like I’m pushing things uphill, and more like I’m free-wheeling down the other side of a hill I’ve climbed through courage and vision and honesty rather than effort and obligation and pressure.

I have had a great deal of really cool experiences with this approach. It helps me be more ready to say YES to opportunities as they present themselves. And it has also opened the flood gates to a whole host of new creative ideas.

If you are looking for ways to tap into your creative imagination, or if you are keen to live the life you want, you would do worse than to give yourself permission to explore what impulses occur to you, moment to moment, when you allow yourself off the motivation hook and get ready to be inspired.

2 Comments

Filed under Creative process, Law of Attraction

Butterfly words

Mel's butterfly

Sometimes you see an image that makes your heart leap. Then you discover something else about it which makes your heart sing. On this occasion this butterfly was made and the photo taken by my childhood friend Melanie McConville, who is one of those people in my life to whom Facebook has made my reconnection possible. When I saw this picture on her wall this morning I fell in love with its beauty and simplicity – but its theme also resonated very strongly with me.

Butterfly words are all too delicate. We capture them and pin them carefully in our journals, preserving as much as possible of their vibrancy, so that they can continue to inspire us, even without flight.

Butterfly words. Flights of fancy. So beautiful, simple and precious.

2 Comments

Filed under Journal Writing

How to use our journals to get into action this festive season

At 11.11 am on Friday 21 December 2012, the leader of the Druids, King Arthur Pendragon, made his Winter Solstice speech at Stonehenge, a little further south of where I live in Wiltshire, welcoming in a new cosmic era of peace, care and compassion, and calling for an end to suffering and greed.

The end of the world hasn’t come to pass. Personally I didn’t think it would. But, not unlike the Druids’ message, I am choosing to view this media-hyped Winter Solstice as a new opportunity, a time of new intentions, commitments and change.

And my journal is where I am devising the change I want to see in the world. However devising sounds like I’m going through a very deliberate process of planning and manipulating my thoughts and ideas about how I want life to be, then writing down a to do list or project plan of what I must achieve in 2013.

This would not be an accurate description of the process. It would be altogether too premeditated, too forced and analytical, too “left-brain”.

Rather I am allowing myself to write in response to what is happening in the world, and I’m being present to the emotions and feelings that real life events are evoking in me. What I find are ideas about how to do things differently, new creative ways to celebrate Christmas, and a quiet conviction that whatever needs to happen will present itself as the obvious next step. It’s an entirely different feeling from the concerted “I must be the change I want to see in the world” mindset. It’s much gentler, much more in the moment, and much more authentic.

One of the ideas that has most inspired me this festive season is the notion of “living well in your place.” So instead of sending Christmas cards this year I have chosen to hand out small parcels of Quality Street choccies to all my neighbours, complete with a folded note giving our phone number, and a thank you to one and all for being my neighbour. Although we have lived in our 25-home street for twelve years, there are some families that I have never met, and I suddenly wanted desperately to change that.

It was whilst writing about my current perceptions¬†in my journal that this idea came to me. It was a moment of “clunk” when inspiration hits and you feel compelled into action. And it was such a simple idea that I can’t believe it had never before occured to me. My daughter and I walked round in the rain and knocked on everyone’s door, handed out the chocolates and our best wishes for Christmas, and basked in the smiles we received. It was truly heart-warming, and confirmed the spirit of Christmas for me and my little girl.

That’s how our journals can help us get into real, genuine and authentic action. And that’s how we can change the world.

With every good wish for the festive season.

Leave a comment

Filed under Journal Writing, Reflective Writing Practice