Tag Archives: Nathan Ohren

What would Nathan do?

It’s day 3 of the 30 day digital journaling challenge and I’m thrilled to be on-board, gaining insights into the journaling progress of so many wonderful people around the world, and also experiencing a new form of journaling for myself.

It’s early days – and I know myself well enough to recognise my penchant and enthusiasm for shiny new things, which can wane after a while, and when real life kicks in – but at the moment I am astounded by the fluency and ease with which my journal entries are tapping themselves out onto my keyboard.

I’ve always been an advocate of handwritten journals, and will never give up the joy of ink and paper, especially when it is beautifully bound, and feels satisfyingly weighty to hold. Plus the fact that I consider writing to be a physical act, involving real fine motor skill and miraculous neural links and networks. Somehow typing has been to this what I would consider Tiger Woods’ Wii golf to be to the real game.

However.

The real reason for this blog  is not to talk about how excited I am to be typing my journal for a change. (Though for anyone wondering what I’m using I have to confess to just creating dated documents in polaris on my android tablet and backing them up to Dropbox.)

No.

The real reason for this entry today is because I want to say a huge, public thank you to Nathan Ohren and his team for making the digital journaling challenge possible – and for being such an engaging and big-hearted champion for personal empowerment through expressive journaling.

I first ‘met’ Nathan in Spring 2013 when he interviewed me for his JournalTalk podcast series. What a great idea! And he turned out to be a great communicator and an excellent talk-show host. Since then he and I have been friends in the social media space and I am always delighted when he contributes his comments in response to events in my life.

Nathan Ohren

So when he invited me to be part of the current challenge I was very honoured. I admire his enthusiasm and drive and willingness to help others achieve their best. I have to admit that sometimes when I’m stuck in my work, wondering how best to contact a prospect or client, or trying to address a thorny communication issue, I often ask myself what Nathan would do. It always helps.

Without wishing to make Nathan blush any more, I’m wondering if this in itself could be a journaling exercise? To identify someone with qualities you admire and wish to emulate; and to enquire, open-heartedly, about what they would do in your shoes when facing a tricky problem.

And don’t forget to thank them when you get the chance.

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Filed under 30 Day Digital Journaling Challenge, Journal Writing

The Journal Writer’s Handbook to be featured on Journal Talk

US based journal coach Nathan Ohren interviewed me a little while ago for his excellent Journal Talk series, and it will be available to hear on 29 April, this coming Monday. Do click on the link above to pick it up and listen in.

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We had a fabulous conversation about journaling and reflective writing – and he managed to wheedle out of me my favourite journaling techniques and exercises. We also discussed the thorny question of digital versus manual journaling, and how journal writing is far from the solipsistic, introspective past time some would have it.

Nathan is an awesome broadcaster with such an easy-going and curious style. We had a few technical challenges making the interview but he was super patient and did an amazing editing job. He may well have a new vocation in sound production!

Nathan Ohren

Like me, Nathan has over 25 years’ journal writing experience and he is absolutely convinced of its benefits. His on-line journal coaching programme runs a couple of times each year and I know he has an intriguing dream journaling programme too which kicks off this summer.

So do go and check out what he’s up to. On his podcasts page you’ll find interviews with US journaling experts Jessica Jensen and Mari McCarthy, both offering different perspectives on journal writing, as well as a neat conversation Nathan had over his birthday dinner with Kathy Lynch about the scientific evidence to prove the effectiveness of journal writing for mental and physical health.

And from Monday 29 April you’ll be able to hear what he has to say about The Journal Writer’s Handbook! Click here to go straight there.

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Meditating on independence

At my daughter’s school they often have a theme for the term – such as courage or friendship or understanding. Theoretically this gives some sort of framework or something to think about during the weekly assemblies and in ‘golden time’. It’s a neat idea – and in a reflective environment I think it would work extremely well. (Just not sure about how reflective a school environment is.)

So I decided to pinch this idea. However, instead of choosing my theme at the beginning of the week, the theme chose me. It crept up on me and presented itself to me rather stealthily.

I was preparing for an up-coming Journal Talk Podcast with US journaling coach Nathan Ohren when I suddenly found myself writing about my role models as a young person. (Nathan’s prep questions are SO good.) And just as suddenly I found myself with a powerful inner conviction that my greatest influences were women who best modeled independence.

The whole concept of independence fascinates me. For me it has moral, ethical and political resonances as well as material ones, and it occured to me that this is a theme worth investigating further.

Interestingly my thought process on this during the past few days has indeed been completely independent of any journaling – as I have done none. At the moment I am happy to hold the inquiry “what does it mean to be independent?” as a form of meditation, a ball that my sub-conscious mind keeps tossing while I get on with my day.

I’m not yet ready to journal on where the meditation is leading me – but I have a sense that it is leading me somewhere quite significant. It’ll be great to see what shows up on the page when I finally enter the reflective classroom of my journal.

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Filed under Reflective Writing Practice